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The Unlikely Convert continues her campaign to glorify God (via TGC)

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Rosaria Butterfield on the Puritans (and more) …..

Three Unbiblical Points

As I write and speak today, 14 years have elapsed since my queer activist days. I’m a new creature in Christ, and my testimony is still like iodine on starch. I’m sensitive to three unbiblical points of view Christian communities harbor when they address the issue of Christianity and homosexuality. Everywhere I go, I confront all three.

1. The Freudian position. This position states same-sex attraction is a morally neutral and fixed part of the personal makeup and identity of some, that some are “gay Christians” and others are not. It’s true that temptation isn’t sin (though what you do with it may be); but that doesn’t give us biblical license to create an identity out of a temptation pattern. To do so is a recipe for disaster. This position comes directly from Sigmund Freud, who effectually replaced the soul with sexual identity as the singular defining characteristic of humanity. God wants our whole identities, not partitioned ones.

2. The revisionist heresy. This position declares that the Bible’s witness against homosexuality, replete throughout the Old and New Testaments, results from misreadings, mistranslations, and misapplications, and that Scripture doesn’t prohibit monogamous homosexual sexual relations, thereby embracing antinomianism and affirming gay marriage.

3. The reparative therapy heresy. This position contends a primary goal of Christianity is to resolve homosexuality through heterosexuality, thus failing to see that repentance and victory over sin are God’s gifts and failing to remember that sons and daughters of the King can be full members of Christ’s body and still struggle with sexual temptation. This heresy is a modern version of the prosperity gospel. Name it. Claim it. Pray the gay away.

Indeed, if you only read modern (post 19th-century) texts, it would rightly seem these are three viable options, not heresies. But I beg to differ.9781573580953-kistler-read-puritans-today

Worldview matters. And if we don’t reach back before the 19th century, back to the Bible itself, the Westminster divines, and the Puritans, we will limp along, defeated. Yes, the Holy Spirit gives you a heart of flesh and the mind to understand and love the Lord and his Word. But without good reading practices even this redeemed heart grows flabby, weak, shaky, and ill. You cannot lose your salvation, but you can lose everything else.

Enter John Owen. Thomas Watson. Richard Baxter. Thomas Brooks. Jeremiah Burroughs. William Gurnall. The Puritans. They didn’t live in a world more pure than ours, but they helped create one that valued biblical literacy. Owen’s work on indwelling sin is the most liberating balm to someone who feels owned by sexual sin. You are what (and how) you read. J. C. Ryle said it takes the whole Bible to make a whole Christian. Why does sin lurk in the minds of believers as a law, demanding to be obeyed? How do we have victory if sin’s tentacles go so deep, if Satan knows our names and addresses? We stand on the ordinary means of grace: Scripture reading, prayer, worship, and the sacraments. We embrace the covenant of church membership for real accountability and community, knowing that left to our own devices we’ll either be led astray or become a danger to those we love most. We read our Bibles daily and in great chunks. We surround ourselves with a great cloud of witnesses who don’t fall prey to the same worldview snares we and our post-19th century cohorts do.

In short, we honor God with our reading diligence. We honor God with our reading sacrifice. If you watch two hours of TV and surf the internet for three, what would happen if you abandoned these habits for reading the Bible and the Puritans? For real. Could the best solution to the sin that enslaves us be just that simple and difficult all at the same time? We create Christian communities that are safe places to struggle because we know sin is also “lurking at [our] door.” God tells us that sin’s “desire is for you, but you shall have mastery over it” (Gen. 4:7). Sin isn’t a matter of knowing better, it isn’t (only) a series of bad choices—and if it were, we wouldn’t need a Savior, just need a new app on our iPhone.

We also take heart, remembering the identity of our soul and thus rejecting the Freudian ideal that sexual identity competes with the soul. And we encourage other image-bearers to reflect the Original in knowledge, righteousness, and holiness, not in the vapid reductionism that claims image-of-God theology means he loves you just way you are, just the way your sin manifests itself. Long hours traveling the road paved by Bible reading, theological study, and a solid grasp on hermeneutical fallacies gets you to a place where as sons and daughters of the King, people tempted in all manner of sin, we echo Owen: “The law grace writes in our hearts must answer to the law written in God’s Word.” We also take heart, remembering that God faithfully walks this journey with us, that victory over sin comes in two forms: liberty from it and humility regarding its stronghold. But it comes, truly, just as he will.

from “You are What — and How — You Read”, by Dr. Rosaria Butterfield, at The Gospel Coalition.

See my review of Dr. Butterfield’s book (The Secret Life of an Unlikely Convert ), The Heroic Faith of Hospitality.

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Written by mrsdkmiller

February 17, 2014 at 8:19 pm

Gospel Talk and Dollar-Store Dross

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A snippet of a song kept going through my head the other day.

“Let your conversation be acceptable in the sight of the Lord.”

It goes way back into my youth group days (waaaayyy back), and I can only remember part of it. I tried to Google the line for the rest of it, and couldn’t find any hits, but I did hit on some Scripture verses it aligns closely, but not exactly, with.

Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O LORD, my rock and my redeemer. (Psalm 19:14)

That sent me on another search for an article that I wrote several years ago for Tabletalk magazine where I examined the concept of gospel conversation, which was itself laid out in a series of sermons by Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs, compiled into a book by the same name.* Burroughs, in his winsome and dialectic style, addressed not simply conversation as speech, but also, as only a thorough Puritan could do, all the ways in which Christians display the gospel in the give and take of life – in the church, in the marketplace, in the home, etc.. We speechlessly talk up what we believe in every sphere by our decisions, actions and reactions, stewardship, friendships, good works, childrearing, buying and selling, love lives, sex lives, because we are, in a way, conversing in all these circumstances.  The full compendium of the doctrines of grace can be at the forefront of those spoken and unspoken conversations if we make a point of it.

All of these musings and memories have a thread running through them, and that is that our gospel conversation, the words of our mouth, must be rooted in meditations of the heart, or else they are nothing more than flat, shiny distractions from the day to day living we experience. Christmas is coming, and we can all tell the difference between the cheap, drossy décor we can pick up at the Dollar Store and that which reflects the beauty of quality materials, a slow and steady refining fire, and the skill and creativity of the craftsman. I think the same is true with our words and whether they are formed from hearts of dross or hearts of true gold.

I faced dross earlier this week and there was much more of it in my heart than I expected to find. A sudden increase in lumbar pain landed me at the surgical center on Tuesday for my first ever steroid injection. Blessed with a high pain threshold, I’ve been through medical events that challenged those thresholds: a dislocated knee that had to be popped back into place, a med-free delivery, a spinal injection for another delivery, so this should not have been an unsettling experience, right?

Except, it was, and I found myself with only rote words of comfort on my lips. Somewhere between the forging of joyful meditation and trudging through the pain, I had forgotten the higher truth behind that casually spoken phrase, “Blessed with…” and had settled into a dependency upon the speech part of gospel conversation to get me through the trials rather than the supernatural grace that leads to glory. When the affliction came, the words were not enough. In fact, I shuddered, lying there on the exam table, as I realized that my words sounded like a mantra!  

Okay, okay, I thought to myself. This isn’t working. Muster up the feelings, recall the truths, glory in the hope.

Thankfully, the Lord in His goodness and mercy saw me through.

Philippians 1:27, the text of Burroughs’ messages, says: “Only let your manner of life be worthy of the gospel of Christ.”

I can’t say my manner was worthy of the gospel of Christ. It took me almost a whole day before I remembered that an abundance of good things had been mine over the past 24 hours:  a doctor with a sure hand, a nurse who seemed to sense my soul distress and rested a hand on mine, a son who was willing to drive me there and wait for two hours, the relief from the injection. I didn’t deserve any of it, and yet the Lord provided. John Piper applies his gentle icepick to thanks-oriented distinctions in his Desiring God blog post this week:

Authentic heart-feelings are not in our control. We can’t make ourselves feel thankfulness. …Thankfeelings are a work of grace. Therefore, as fallen sinners whose hearts are often dull, we should regularly pray for God to overcome our sinful hardness, and cause us to see his goodness and feel thankful. (Psalm 51:10-12) [John Piper,”Thanksgiving, Thanksfeeling and the Glory of God”]

Cultivating a language of thankfulness begins with more than rehearsed self-talk. When the soul-ground is turned over in recognition that all good things come from God, when showers of grace quench my thirsty, arid heart-soil so that seedlings flower into authentic gratitude, then my lips and my heart overflow with thanksgiving! Yes, this adversity is worth it for the sake of His glory!

So the sacrifice of thanksgiving that glorifies God is the offering of contrite and broken-hearted thankfulness for undeserved mercies. This makes God looks glorious – it glorifies him. [Piper]

I lost an opportunity to glorify God in the conversation of getting an injection in my back. May my manner of life be more worthy of the gospel of Christ in what I do tomorrow and the day after. May the Lord do that daily work of grace in me to overcome my sinful hard-heartedness. May my meditations on the adversity – and the words on my lips about it – be acceptable in your sight, O Lord!

*That article is now available in digital form only through Logos Bible Software.

Written by mrsdkmiller

November 28, 2013 at 8:52 pm

Meet the Puritans at the party going on over at the Essential Owen blog….

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The Essential Owen is giving away a copy of Meet the Puritans by Joel Beeke and Randall Peterson. Go to the site to sign up to be eligible.

On his Amazon review of the book, Tim Challies says:

Meet the Puritans is a resource designed to guide people through the reprints of Puritan writings that have been produced since 1956. The book provides “a brief biography of each Puritan author whose works have been reprinted since 1956 and a short review of those books. We hope this will help purchasers of Puritan books, interest other readers in the Puritans, and guide those already immersed in Puritan literature to further depths of study.” It is more a reference book than one you would be likely to read from cover-to-cover, though if you wanted to, you certainly could.

…Quite simply, if you are interesting in reading the Puritans, this is a guide you won’t want to be without! It is endorsed by a who’s who of Reformed leaders and authors (the back cover alone has endorsements by Sproul, Piper, MacArthur, Packer and Mohler and there are many more inside!) and deservedly so. Best of all, it promises to be a book that will be updated as time goes on and as these great writings continue to be released.

Written by mrsdkmiller

October 8, 2011 at 12:56 pm

Posted in Books

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